Filed under High Octane

Have you tried kale yet this year?

Have you tried kale yet this year?

It’s nutrient-dense, loaded with protective anti-oxidants (e.g.beta-carotene and lutein) and restorative anti- inflammatory nutrients  (e.g. omega-3 fatty acids), is a powerhouse vegetable that tastes “really good–much better than I expected–I really like it!”, according to many recently-polled PA students. Try it raw in your salad or sandwich, add it to your next stir fry and … Continue reading

Fuel Blue!

P.A. Power Eating, “Fuel Blue” Optimal energy in sports and academics is an Andover essential. To get and keep that competitive edge, you need high-octane foods.  How? It’s easy – look for the Team Gunga icons in Commons. P.A. Power Eating groups these “power” foods together so that you can easily choose nutrient-packed meals and … Continue reading

Why Carbs are your Best Friend

Why Carbs are your Best Friend

Carbohydrates…..aren’t they bad for us?  Fat-encouraging and useless?  Not healthy? Consider this: athletes who eat too little carbohydrate feel needlessly fatigued due to glycogen depletion.  Afternoon sports are hard enough….why would you ever want to encourage a feeling of fatigue?  You wouldn’t, of course. Want to read more?  Here’s recent article on carb-skimping athletes by … Continue reading

Raisin’ Hell with Raisins

Raisin’ Hell with Raisins

Raisin’ Hell with Raisins   Looking for a no-cost sports gel alternative? Look no further than the salad bar for a handful of raisins.   Sports Dietetics – USA Research Digest, Winter 2013, says, of a research study on raisins: “The results of this study indicate that a whole food carbohydrate source (raisins) was associated … Continue reading

Can’t Beat Beets for Lunch

Can’t Beat Beets for Lunch

Want some extra power to fuel your afternoon practice?  Add beets to your salad at lunch.  Why? Beets are rich in dietary nitrates, which convert to nitric oxide (NO).  As NO dilates blood vessels, you’ll use need less oxygen during exercise. Bicyclists who tried this tip improved an average of 2.8% in a trial trial … Continue reading